OKABAYASHI Tamaki

写真a

 

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  • Development of a LAMP assay for rapid and sensitive detection and differentiation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium and subsp. hominissuis.

    Yashiki N, Yamazaki Y, Subangkit M, Okabayashi T, Yamazaki W, Goto Y

    Letters in applied microbiology     2019.06

    Joint Work

    DOI PubMed

  • Genotyping of swine Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis isolates from Kyushu, Japan.

    Subangkit M, Yamamoto T, Ishida M, Nomura A, Yasiki N, Sudaryatma PE, Goto Y, Okabayashi T

    The Journal of veterinary medical science     2019.06  [Refereed]

    Joint Work

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    <p>The incidence of diseases caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) is increasing annually worldwide, including Japan.<i> Mycobacterium avium </i>subsp.<i> hoiminissuis </i>(MAH) is one of the most common NTM species responsible for chronic lung diseases in animals and humans. In the current study, mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR) typing was employed to characterize the genetic diversity of swine MAH isolates from Kyushu, Japan. In total, 309 isolates were obtained from the lymph nodes of 107 pigs not displaying any clinical signs of disease, of which 307 were identified as MAH, comprising 173 strains. Based on eight established MIRU-VNTR loci, the MAH strains represented 50 genotypes constituting three lineages, and 29 had not been described in the Mac French National Institute for Agricultural Research Nouzilly MIRU-VNTR (Mac-INVM) database. MAH was the dominant <i>M. avium</i> complex (MAC) in pigs from Kyushu, and there was high genetic diversity among genotype profiles of MAH from Kyushu. We identified three predominant genotype profiles in the tested area sharing high relatedness with genotype profiles of strains isolated in European countries. MAH was the most common NTM in pigs from Kyushu and exhibited high diversity, with new strain-derived genotypes.</p>

    DOI PubMed CiNii

  • Detection of neutralizing antibody against porcine epidemic diarrhea virus in subclinical infectedfinishing pigs.

    Koike N., Mai TN., Shirai M., Kubo M., Hata K., Marumoto N., Watanabe S., Sasaki Y., Mitoma S., Notsu K., Okabayashi T., Wiratsubaki A. ,Kabali E., Norimine J., Sekiguchi S.

    J. Vet. Med. Sci.     2018.11  [Refereed]

    Joint Work

  • Mass spectrometry-based identification and whole-genome characterisation of the first pteropine orthoreovirus isolated from monkey faeces in Thailand

    Kosoltanapiwat N., Reamtong O., Okabayashi T., Ampawong S., Rungruengkitkun A., Thiangtrongjit T., Thippornchai N., Leaungwutiwong P., Mahittikorn A., Mori H., Yoohanngoa T., Yamwong P.

    BMC Microbiology   18   135   2018.10  [Refereed]

    Joint Work

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    © 2018 The Author(s). Background: The pteropine orthoreovirus (PRV) was isolated from monkey (Macaca fascicularis) faecal samples collected from human-inhabited areas in Lopburi Province, Thailand. These samples were initially obtained to survey for the presence of hepatitis E virus (HEV). Results: Two virus isolates were retrieved by virus culture of 55 monkey faecal samples. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was successfully used to identify the viruses as the segmented dsRNA orthoreovirus. Phylogenetic analysis of the Lopburi orthoreovirus whole-genomes revealed relationships with the well-characterised PRVs Pulau (segment L1), Cangyuan (segments L2, M3 and S3), Melaka (segments L3 and M2), Kampar (segments M1 and S2) and Sikamat (segments S1 and S4) of Southeast Asia and China with nucleotide sequence identities of 93.5-98.9%. RT-PCR showed that PRV was detected in 10.9% (6/55) and HEV was detected in 25.5% (14/55) of the monkey faecal samples. Conclusions: PRV was isolated from monkey faeces for the first time in Thailand via viral culture and LC-MS/MS. The genetic diversity of the virus genome segments suggested a re-assortment within the PRV species group. The overall findings emphasise that monkey faeces can be sources of zoonotic viruses, including PRV and HEV, and suggest the need for active virus surveillance in areas of human and monkey co-habitation to prevent and control emerging zoonotic diseases in the future.

    DOI PubMed

  • Bovine respiratory syncytial virus infection enhances Pasteurella multocida adherence on respiratory epithelial cells

    Sudaryatma P., Nakamura K., Mekata H., Sekiguchi S., Kubo M., Kobayashi I., Subangkit M., Goto Y., Okabayashi T.

    Veterinary Microbiology   220   33 - 38   2018.07  [Refereed]

    Joint Work

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    © 2018 Elsevier B.V. Primary infection with bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) predisposes cattle to secondary infection with bacteria that cause bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC). However, the interaction between BRSV and bacteria is unclear. This in vitro study examined the adherence of Pasteurella multocida (PM) to BRSV-infected cells was assessed in colony forming unit assays, by flow cytometry analysis, and by indirect immunofluorescence analysis (IFA) of epithelial cells (A549, HEp-2, and MDBK). An in vitro model based on infection of BRSV-infected epithelial cells revealed that PM adherence to BRSV-infected cells was 2- to 8-fold higher than uninfected cells. This was confirmed by flow cytometry analysis and IFA. Epithelial cell expression of mRNA encoding cytokines and chemokines increased after exposure to PM, but increased further after co-infection with BRSV and PM. BRSV-mediated adherence of PM to epithelial cells may underlie the serious symptoms of BRDC.

    DOI PubMed

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