KANEKO Yasuyuki

写真a

Title

Assistant Professor

 

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  • Retrospective analysis of canine gallbladder contents in biliary sludge and gallbladder mucoceles

    MIZUTANI Shinya, TORISU Shidow, KANEKO Yasuyuki, YAMAMOTO Shushi, FUJIMOTO Shinsuke, ONG Benedict Huai Ern, NAGANOBU Kiyokazu

    The Journal of Veterinary Medical Science   79   366 - 374   2017  [Refereed]

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    <p>The pathophysiology of canine gallbladder diseases, including biliary sludge, gallbladder mucoceles and gallstones, is poorly understood. This study aimed to evaluate the component of gallbladder contents and bacterial infection of the gallbladder in order to elucidate the pathophysiology of biliary sludge and gallbladder mucoceles. A total of 43 samples of canine gallbladder contents (biliary sludge, 21 and gallbladder mucoceles, 22) were subjected to component analysis by infrared spectroscopy, and the resultant infrared spectra were compared with that of swine mucin. Of the 43 samples, 41 were also evaluated by aerobic and anaerobic bacterial culture. The contents of 20 (95.2%) biliary sludge and 22 (100%) gallbladder mucocele samples exhibited similar infrared spectra as swine mucin. Although biliary sludge and gallbladder mucocele contents exhibited similar infrared spectra, one sample of biliary sludge (4.8%) was determined to be composed of proteins. The rate of bacterial infection of the gallbladder was 10.0% for biliary sludge and 14.3% for gallbladder mucoceles. Almost all of the identified bacterial species were intestinal flora. These results indicate that the principal components of gallbladder contents in both gallbladder mucoceles and biliary sludge are mucins and that both pathophysiologies exhibit low rates of bacterial infection of the gallbladder. Therefore, it is possible that gallbladder mucoceles and biliary sludge have the same pathophysiology, and, rather than being independent diseases, they could possibly represent a continuous disease. Thus, biliary sludge could be considered as the stage preceding the appearance of gallbladder mucoceles.</p>

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  • A case report of suspected hepatopulmonary syndrome secondary to ductal plate malformation with chronic active hepatitis in a dog

    KANEKO Yasuyuki, TORISU Shidow, HAGIO Mitsuyoshi, YAMAGUCHI Ryoji, MIZUTANI Shinya, NAGANOBU Kiyokazu

    Journal of Veterinary Medical Science   78   493 - 497   2016  [Refereed]

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    Hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) is a respiratory complication of hepatic disease, that is well recognized in humans and defined by the presence of 1) liver disease, 2) hypoxemia and/or high alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient (AaDO2) and 3) intrapulmonary vasodilatation. The present report describes a similar case of HPS in a dog. A six-month-old Papillon was diagnosed with ductal plate malformation with chronic active hepatitis and showed progressive increases in AaDO2 over the course of the following six months. The presence of intrapulmonary vasodilatation was confirmed by agitated saline contrast transthoracic echocardiography. Also, the absence of congenital cardiac defect was confirmed by transthoracic echocardiography. From these results, we suspected that this dog had HPS. This is the first description of suspected canine HPS.

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  • Arterial blood gas anomaly in canine hepatobiliary disease

    KANEKO Yasuyuki, TORISU Shidow, KOBAYASHI Takumi, MIZUTANI Shinya, TSUZUKI Nao, SONODA Hiroko, IKEDA Masahiro, NAGANOBU Kiyokazu

    Journal of Veterinary Medical Science   0   2015  [Refereed]

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    Arterial blood gas analysis is an important diagnostic and monitoring tool for respiratory abnormalities. In human medicine, lung complications often occur as a result of liver disease. Although pulmonary complications of liver disease have not been reported in dogs, we have frequently encountered hypoxemia in dogs with liver disorders, especially extrahepatic biliary obstruction. In addition, respiratory disorders account for 20% of perioperative fatalities in dogs. Therefore, in this study, we evaluated the respiratory status in dogs with hepatobiliary disease by arterial blood gas analysis. PaO<sub>2</sub> and PaCO<sub>2</sub> were measured. Alveolar-arterial oxygen difference (AaDO<sub>2</sub>), the indicator of gas exchange efficiency, was calculated. Compared to healthy dogs (control group), hepatobiliary disease dogs had significantly lower PaO<sub>2</sub> and higher AaDO<sub>2</sub>. Hypoxemia (PaO<sub>2</sub> of ≤80 mmHg) was observed in 28/71 dogs with hepatobiliary disease. AaDO<sub>2</sub> was higher (≥30 mmHg) than the control group range (11.6 to 26.4 mmHg) in 32/71 hepatobiliary disease dogs. By classifying type of hepatobiliary disease, dogs with extrahepatic biliary obstruction and chronic hepatitis showed significantly lower PaO<sub>2</sub> and higher AaDO<sub>2</sub> than in a control group. Dogs with chronic hepatitis also had significantly lower PaCO<sub>2</sub>. The present study shows that dogs with hepatobiliary disease have respiratory abnormalities more than healthy dogs. Preanesthetic or routine arterial blood gas analysis is likely beneficial to detect the respiratory abnormalities in dogs with hepatobiliary disease, especially extrahepatic biliary obstruction and chronic hepatitis.

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  • E ect of major ozonated autohemotherapy for reduction of intraoperative oxidative stress

      23   20 - 22   2015  [Refereed]

    Joint Work

  • Laparoscopic cryptorchidectomy in standing bulls

    KANEKO Yasuyuki, TORISU Shidow, KITAHARA Go, HIDAKA Yuichi, SATOH Hiroyuki, ASANUMA Taketoshi, MIZUTANI Shinya, OSAWA Takeshi, NAGANOBU Kiyokazu

    Journal of Veterinary Medical Science   0   2015  [Refereed]

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    Laparoscopic cryptorchidectomy without insufflation was applied in 10 standing bulls aged 3 to 15 months. Nine bulls were preoperatively pointed out intra-abdominal testes by computed tomography. Preoperative fasting for a minimum of 24 hr provided laparoscopic visualization of intra-abdominal area from the kidney to the inguinal region. Surgical procedure was interrupted by intra-abdominal fat and testis size. It took 0.6 to 1.5 hr in 4 animals weighing 98 to 139 kg, 0.8 to 2.8 hr in 4 animals weighing 170 to 187 kg, and 3 and 4hr in 2 animals weighing 244 and 300 kg to complete the cryptorchidectomy. In conclusion, standing gasless laparoscopic cryptorchidectomy seems to most suitable for bulls weighing from 100 to 180 kg.

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